Research and Curriculum Development 2011

Research          Curriculum Development

CLRD Highlights in 2011

The science (secondary) and mathematics (elementary and secondary) staff conducted interviews and administered interview questionnaires to 20 science teachers, 31 mathematics teachers and 2 science department heads from 4 public schools (1 elementary and 3 high schools) in Pasig City and Quezon City involved in Collaborative Lesson Research and Development (CLRD) in January and February.

Based on their responses, all the science and mathematics teachers expressed gains for both teachers and students such as: being able to address science misconceptions held by teachers; learning of additional teaching skills and strategies such as teaching mathematics through problem solving, classroom management skills, and preparation of materials for teaching. Moreover, the collaborative undertaking helped them realize that there are many “ways of making the lesson more understandable.” Hence, it is possible to develop a good lesson because, as the mathematics teachers mentioned, “being together, we can share ideas and insights which are very important inputs in developing a lesson. By sharing ideas, each one learned from each other.” In the same vein, the science teachers expressed that they “learned how to accept mistakes and correct” them because of the unity, openness, trust and camaraderie experienced while working together which gives confidence in teaching. It is beautifully expressed by a teacher in Quezon City—“It destroys the wall between senior and new teachers.”

The teachers also noted that the CLRD experience had a positive impact on the students. According to the science teachers, the learners became responsive, more interested, well motivated and eager to learn. It was noted by the mathematics teachers that with the student-centered lessons, mathematics students could be eager, creative, and imaginative in doing problem-solving tasks, and if given the opportunity to think and explore independently, the students can come up with different solutions to solve a problem. The teachers noted that, in addition to development of skills in thinking and communication, the students’ self-esteem increased and they were satisfied with the group learning experiences.

However, about one-third of the science teachers expressed difficulty in planning the lessons and activities due to time constraints. Another difficulty seems to be related to the implementation of the lesson. A teacher expressed nervousness on being observed. Similarly, the mathematics teachers expressed difficulty in developing activities and problems that would be used in the lessons, and in anticipating the questions students may pose. During implementation of the lessons, the mathematics teachers noted the following difficulties: how to handle/process unexpected responses of students, elicit responses from them, and implement the lessons in the lower sections.

In general, the teachers recommended the continuation of the collaboration. They suggested that more time and more meetings for planning and critiquing are needed along with the involvement and participation of more, (and younger) teachers, and administrators. In addition, some even expressed the desire to make the CLRD activity twice a year instead of only once and to include more topics and activities, as well as the use of the language preferred by the students.

Although they differed in their involvements—one as observer, and the other, as part of the team, the two science department heads appreciated the collaborative effort which helped in improving both teachers and students. They are also one with the teachers for the continuance of the project because of the benefits in terms of enhancing teachers’ knowledge of strategies and content, and time management.

Activities of the CLRD Research Teams

A summary of the activities of the Mathematics and Science Research Teams in 2011 is presented below:

Grade or Year Level, Staff Involved, School teachers Involved Activities Completed/Output Period Covered
High School Mathematics 1
Sta. Lucia High School (1 NISMED staff; 5 teachers) Implementation of a revised lessonand classroom observation Jluy
Sta. Lucia High School (1 NISMED staff; 5 teachers) Planning, development, implementation of anew lesson, and classroom observation July
High School Mathematics 2
Sta. Lucia High School (1 NISMED staff; 5 teachers) Implementation of a revised lesson and classroom observation Jluy
Sta. Lucia High School (1 NISMED staff; 5 teachers) Planning and development of a new lesson November to December
High School Mathematics 3
Sta. Lucia High School (1 NISMED staff; 5 teachers) Implementation of a revised lesson and classroom observation Initial planning of a new lesson September
High School Mathematics 4
Sta. Lucia High School (2 NISMED staff; 5 teachers) Implementation of a revised lesson and classroom observation Initial planning of a new lesson July and September to December
Elementary School Mathematics
Commonwealth Elementary School (4 NISMED staff; 11 teachers) Implementation of a revised lesson and classroom observation November to December
Subject Area, Staff Involved, School Teachers Involved  Activities Completed/Output  Period Covered
Earth and Environmental Science
Rizal High School (2 NISMED staff; 6 teachers)
  1. Planning of a research lesson
  2. Implementation of a research lesson and classroom observation
  3. Lesson plan refined
August to December
Biology
Rizal High School (4 NISMED staff; 4 teachers)
  1. Planning of a research lesson
  2. Implementation of a research lesson and classroom observation
  3. Lesson plan refined
June to July
Chemistry
Rizal High School (2 NISMED staff; 4 teachers)
  1. Planning of a research lesson
  2. Implementation of a research lesson and classroom observation
  3. Lesson plan finalized
August to September
North Fairview High School (3 NISMED staff; 6 teachers)
  1. Planning of a research lesson
  2. Implementation of a research lesson and classroom observation
  3. Lesson plan finalized
July to October
Physics
North Fairview High School (2 NISMED staff; 6 teachers)
  1. Planning of a research lesson
  2. Implementation of a research lesson and classroom observation
August to October

ESS Laying Groundwork for Collaboration with Elementary School Science Teachers

The Elementary School Science Group conceptualized a research on lesson planning practices. This survey is intended to help identify what science teachers need to enable them to facilitate effective teaching-learning interactions in Science with their pupils. A draft questionnaire was developed before the end of 2011. Hopefully, this needs assessment of science teachers in a school will lead to a collaborative lesson research and development activity with them in the following year.

Involvement in the K to 12 Curriculum Reform

In 2011, NISMED science and mathematics academic staff participated actively in workshops for the development of the content standards, performance standards, and learning competencies of the K to 12 Science and Mathematics Curriculum Framework and spiralling of topics across grade levels. Director Merle C. Tan was designated Convenor for Science by DepED. Dr. Soledad A. Ulep and Lydia M. Landrito led members of the NISMED Mathematics Group in the development of the K to 12 Mathematics Curriculum Framework with Dr. Ian June L. Garces of Ateneo de Manila University as Convenor in collaboration with representatives from other universities and organizations.

Towards the end of 2011, development of modules for Grades 1 and 7 Mathematics and Grade 7 Science began.

Module on Seed Germination

The module is published in two editions: for teachers and for pupils. The Teachers’ Edition contains all the pupils’ activities as well as a unit plan, overview and teaching tips for the conduct of the activities by the pupils under the supervision of the teacher. It contains background information needed by the teacher and answers to the embedded questions and summative assessment items.

The Pupils’ Activities consists of hands-on, minds-on, and hearts-on activities in line with the practical work approach, providing opportunities for pupils to construct the correct concepts in a step-by-step, engaging manner, as they practice the processes of science inquiry. All the activities incorporate questions pupils need to answer to assess themselves as well as provide feedback to teachers regarding their learning. A summative test is provided at the end.

Multimedia Materials Development Project

For years, UP NISMED has been developing curriculum materials either in print or video format. In 2011, the Institute explored the possibility of developing materials which can both be accessed online and through using the traditional disk storage device for those with no internet connection. The Institute sought the help of the UP Information Technology Training Center (ITTC) for this project and the latter’s technologists generously gave NISMED free hosting in their server and technical assistance for its administration.

The Multimedia Materials Development Project (MMDP) team created the AGIMAT sa Pagtuturo website. AGIMAT is an acronym for Agham, Impormasyon, at Matematika. It will contain the information and resources for science and mathematics teaching developed by UP NISMED staff. The site is envisioned to become operational during the first quarter of 2012 at this address http://curriculum.nismed/upd.edu.ph. In this connection, the MMDP team conducted an in-house seminar workshop in December on working with WordPress, the platform used for the site.

The materials developed in 2011 are: Conducting Science Investigatory Projects in PowerPoint format; How to Construct a Lung-Chest Model; Using the Lung-Chest Model in video format; and four interactive worksheets in GeoGebra.